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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

I figured since I’ve been lurking on this site for many years I would show the progress of my car with the things I’ve learned and done. So here's the info about the car:

Canadian Car that i bought new in summer of 2006.
2006 Focus ZX3 with GFX package
5spd with no traction control

Work currently done:

SVT interior swap (red inserts)
SVT color matched mirrors and handles
Rear SVT disk brakes
Magnaflow exhaust
Focus Sport intake
Tuner from FSwerks
FSwerks strut tower brace
FSwerks lower fron brace
FSwerks rear brace
H+R linear coil overs
17" OZ wheels
Steeda 21mm rear sway bar
ANZO headlights with HIDs (6000K) in projector only

Work in progress

Engine & Trans

2.3l (from 2005 ST)
Ranger crank
Cleveite H series rod and main bearings
Eagle rods with ARP 2000s
Supertech 9.0:1 pistons (0.5mm overbore)
Massive trapped oil system
Massive EGR delete
ARP mains
ARP head bolts
ARP Flywheel bolts
Crower springs and retainers
Crane stage 1 cams
Cosworth intake manifold
FSwerks stage 2 turbo with GT28r (GT2560r)
3" downpipe with 3" v-band
60# EV6 injectors
All 3 poly motor mounts
M Factory LSD
Clutch Masters FX-350 with Aluminium flywheel
FSwerks 2.5" stealth exhaust


Ebaiach 24mm rear and 25mm front sway bar
CFM lower control arms
Massive rear toe arms
Massive rear camber arms
Massive front adjustable end links


The car the new motor is going into
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The donor car
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Painting the motor
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Installing new gasket getting ready to install head


Crank, rods and pistons installed
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Crower valve springs and retainers



Tapped an oil return

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Massive trapped oil pan

 

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Looking forward to seeing how it runs! Good luck!
 

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Supertech 9.0:1 pistons (0.5mm overbore)
1985 called and he said he's keeping all your horsepower. :p

That would be the only thing I'd probably change about your build would be the compression. Mark (Sutyak) is running ~10.4:1 compression, and my build is ~10.8:1 compression. Everything else looks great.
 

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Recaros for Corbeaus and Boyds!
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And I stupidly ran 9:1 88mm Pistons. And now I regret it, mainly cause of my machinist... But i plan on going back to over 10:1 as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
And I stupidly ran 9:1 88mm Pistons. And now I regret it, mainly cause of my machinist... But i plan on going back to over 10:1 as well.
Why exactly?

I know I wouldnt of needed 9:1 but fuel can be quite bad where I'll be mainly using it. Which may not even matter anyway but oh well.
 

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Recaros for Corbeaus and Boyds!
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As to switching back to 10:1? More power. Lol

I'm sure there's other reasons, that I don't know. I'm sure Bryce does though. That does basically the walking Internet. Anytime I have a question I go to him.
 

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As to switching back to 10:1? More power. Lol

I'm sure there's other reasons, that I don't know. I'm sure Bryce does though. That does basically the walking Internet. Anytime I have a question I go to him.
It's all about thermal efficiency. The days of lowering compression to handle more boost came from a big misunderstanding of quench. It's not high compression that causes detonation in a boosted motor, it's quench. There's a reason the hemi-style heads are still the gods of boosted motors. They have no quench pads. Quench area in a boosted cylinder is redundant because the air/fuel mixture that's being forced into the cylinder under pressure already creates your quench. All that quench area ends up doing is creating a potential hot spot and begging for a cracked ring land. Lowering the static compression was a bandaid for this issue but not a solution. Our pentroof 4v chambers have very small quench pads on opposite sides of the chamber. The spark plug is also centrally located which allows for a consistent and steady expansion of the flame front through the cylinder upon combustion. This is why our motors are much more capable of handling higher pressure. Older heart style chambers with large quench pads didn't have this kind of efficiency. Some experimentation showed that cutting out the quench pads (often known as "softening" the chamber) and blending them eliminated this issue and allowed for much more compression without detonation. Since then you've started seeing nitrous motors capable of 16+:1 compression and turbo/supercharged motors achieving over 12:1 compression. Quench makes the cylinder turbulent and speeds up the flame front. Combine that with an already fast burning mixture of boost and extra fuel, it's going to speed it up too much. Getting rid of the quench solves the issue. Our chambers can benefit from having the small quench areas cut out but already works incredibly well like it is.

Another misconception is that advancing the timing further makes more power and lowering compression (thereby lowering dynamic pressure and slowing the flame front) allowed for more spark timing and so it caught on. This is actually quite wrong. You want to time the spark so that the air/fuel mixture ignites at the right moment to allow the flame front to reach the piston at ~15-20* ATDC. At 15-20 degrees of crank rotation after the piston reaches the top of the cylinder is when you want the flame front to hit the piston with full force cause that is your point of greatest leverage against the crankshaft, getting more efficiency from the combustion resulting in more torque. Ignite it too soon and the flame front hits the piston too soon when the piston can't be pushed down as easily, lowering efficiency and losing power. Go too far and it'll cause detonation because the combustion wants to expand but the piston isn't at enough of a crank angle to get out of its way. Similar goes if the spark isn't advanced far enough and the flame front hits after that optimum point, resulting in wasted energy and less power. The lower the dynamic pressure in the cylinder, the sooner the mixture has to be ignited to hit this optimum timing because the less dense mixture will burn slower. You also have to increase that spark advance as rpm increases cause while the engine speed increases, the flame front speed does not. This is why you'll often see spark tables that will start out low at lower rpm and ramp up to peak advance at higher rpm. It doesn't matter if you're igniting the fuel at 50* advanced or -10* retarded so long as that mixture is hitting the piston at the optimum point. A certain car I was helping work on last month is an 11.6:1 compression 363ci SBF with a S476 at 26psi. The motor is extremely responsive, spools lightening fast, and is a blast to drive. The logs at the track had the spark timing in the negative digits for most of the run. Its launching with -4* of spark on the transbrake and cutting consistent 1.30-1.32 60ft times on a small 235 tire. The AFR 225 heads have softened chambers with practically no quench area left in them and a true flat top piston.

Now of course our engines are a different ball game but the same principles still apply. With very little quench pads in our chambers, don't be afraid to raise the compression with boost. Also don't be afraid to have to the spark timing in single or even negative digits at WOT. I also run NGK BR6EF plugs with the recessed tip which puts the point of ignition that much further away from the piston, giving a very small increase in tuning window but still something.

Anything under 9.5:1 compression in a duratec is just flushing response, power, and spool down the toilet. A good compromise for a streetable duratec is around the stock compression range of 9.6-10.0. A more aggressive approach is in that 10.1-10.8 range which will still hold up well with good quality pump gas and a good tune. The main thing with the higher compression is just make the flame front as consistent and smooth as possible. Any sharp edges or bumps in the cylinders, such as sharp corners of valve reliefs in the piston and dome pistons, will increase the chance of detonation.

A last note is bigger turbos will be more effective with higher compression and respond to it very well.
 

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I wish we still had a like button. Thanks for the explanation Bryce! Needs more pictures/diagrams, though. :)
Very interesting info on the spark advance, too. My spark is in the single digits in the upper RPM/load to control knock and worry that is robbing power, but I guess not.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks a lot for the explanation! Definitely helps explain it all. But now I, like Wobb wish I would have went with a higher ratio. I don’t see it being a crazy loss so, but it would have been nice. Like many things shouda, coulda, woulda!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It happens... If you're only going for 320whp, than 9:1 will be good.
I think 320 will be lots for I'll settle for 300 even. After all it's only FWD. And if I want more power my cobra easily fill that. It's also the reason why I'm doing this build since it made the focus boring.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Recaros for Corbeaus and Boyds!
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I had 315/296 on my stock engine, and it was an absolute blast. I'll be around that again soon, but I did enjoy it. You will as well.
 

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I am subscribing to this as my build will be very similar. Was thinking of going 9:1 with a GT2871, but after reading that massive wall of text I don't know...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well lots of work has been completed.

How I started. Stockish 2.0
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Bumper removed


Crank in timed position








My screw up was turning the motor and left the plate in. So I removed the chucked and cleaned it. Was still able to re insert the timing bar and the broke off chunk weighted less than a gram so I just left it. It should be ok. Showed it to a automotive mechanic and he didn’t seem worried either.


2.0 almost redy to be removed


2.3 ready to go







All the parts that came off


2.3 mounted


Intercooler and piping mouted




Installed 300mm brakes. Will finish painting later. Also installed Massive adjustable end links, CFM lower control arms and an Eibach 22mm front sway bar. Already H+Rs



Installed: Massive camber arms, toe arms, and new lower control arms. I have Prothane bushing for the lower control arms just not yet installed


This is where I ran all my lines (vacuum lines, AFR, etc). I just used a step drill to make the hole.


Well I jumped ahead alot and didnt take as much photos as I should of. Here is the nearly finished product. I just want to paint the brass fittings for the catch can. I have both the crank case vent (1/2") and the valve cover (3/8") going into the same can. Anyone else do this?


A pillar gauge setup. Bottom is an AEM failsafe so displays both AFR in digital and Boost on the circular graph. Top is oil pressure, which I still have to run a line for yet. Don’t quite know how others have done it. So ill research that and figure it out.


Where I installed my eBoost2


So now im just in the tuning stages with Raffi at FSwerks. So far its been running quite pig rich with the 60# injectors but were making progress. I havent been able to drive it yet just doing the idle and rev logs. Project has to go on hold for a week on my part then hopfully I can drive it
 
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