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Discussion Starter #1
Trying to do a rear spring swap during the weekend. But on the driver side both bolts on the main arm was sear
, other than cut/drill there is no way around right?

while I am at it I am looking at the CFM rear control arm bushing kit, if I don't have a press is it impossible to install those? And I remember there is one bushing at the back I shouldn't touch it, which one is it?

Do anyone have all the part number for rear suspension bolt?
 

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for rusted/siezed bolts, nothing is better than patience and PB Blaster....starting a day or more before you plan to work on the car, start soaking the bolts with shots of Blaster... It was a life-saver when I installed my RT hi flow cat.

If you still can't get the bolts to budge, spray some more Blaster and take a break.
 

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While I can't help the thread starter because I havn't experienced this myself, I have read on here about others that were not able to get those bolts out. No ammount of PB blaster would work. I think I even remember of one that just replaced the whole arm. I tried searching for the threads but I couldn't find anything. All I remember was that is is definately a northern problem. Possibly something to do with salt and corrosion.

Perhaps somebody with actuall experience will chime in soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yep, no amount of wd-40 will eat 1 inch deep rust. So my question is more about part # and bushing.
 

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If you've gotten the bolt to come out of the nut, but it won't come out of the bushing.

it never will.

your going to have to cut that bolt off and replace that arm. the reason being is that the inner sleeve of the bushing and bolt adhere together corrosion and heat and rust.

the inner sleeve detaches itself from the rubber bushing and b/c the bolt and sleeve become larger then the diameter of the opening, it gets stuck adn jsut keeps spinning.

Ford doesn't sell just that bushing and bolt. so you need to replace the lower arms.

they only cost about $40 or $50 and its cheap insurance to things not falling apart.

Call Steve @ Touslety ford 1.800.328.9552 and he'll get ya one ASAP.

and I wouldn't go in and replace all those bushings iwht poly-u.

I'd replace just the control blade bushing that bolts up to the unibody by the sideskirt.
 

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I seen an experienced mechanic tackle the rusted bolt issue with the following technique.

Using something like a big forged steel rod, somewhat blunt so it has more of impact force. For example, he used a 4" long, 1/4" ratchet extension.

Place the rod against the flat part of the Nut. Strike Down upon the rod with the biggest hammer you can find, and this will break loose the nut and make it easier to turn.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
your going to have to cut that bolt off and replace that arm. the reason being is that the inner sleeve of the bushing and bolt adhere together corrosion and heat and rust.

the inner sleeve detaches itself from the rubber bushing and b/c the bolt and sleeve become larger then the diameter of the opening, it gets stuck adn jsut keeps spinning.
I fully understand everything but why do I need to replace the whole arm? Can't I cut the bolt drill it out and
1) replace the bushing
2) clean all the rust in the inter sleeve and reuse it? This is what I did last time.
 

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the stock bushings have a metal sleeve that goes around the bushing on teh outside and sit into the control arm holes.

if you go to cut that bolt your going to be cutting that bushing sleeve.

yes, you could just use the prothane stuff, but w/o a press...your gona be there for a long time.

plus I think that a control arm costs less then the bushings and time its gona take to install them.

and either way since your changing springs your gona need an alignment.
 

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If you haven't FUBAR'd the bushing yet, leave it alone. You can swap the rear springs without unbolting any of the arm bolts. Just use a spring compressor with the wheel raised.

I learned the hard way not to trust all this nonsense about unbolting the arm. I ended up breaking the nut free from where it's welded in place, and I couldn't get the bolt out. I had to Mickey Mouse the whole thing, using a Dremel to clean up the weld slag and replacing the nut with a new one. Basically, I wasted a couple of hours of my life with the whole unbolt-the-control-arm method.

So I say LEAVE THE CONTROL ARMS ALONE!

But that's just my opinion.
 

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Also, I'm pretty sure that in order to follow the Design Height procedure, you need the arms bolted in place with the springs removed. But I could be wrong about that, and maybe you don't need to follow the Design Height procedure for a spring swap (I had to do it for my antiroll bar installation when I switched to the SVT suspension).
 

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Good point Dudley. I've even heard of people just using a bunch of zip-ties on the springs with the car on the ground. That way, when you put the car in the air, the stock spring will just fall out. The stock springs are very close to coming out in the first place. But for a disclaimer: YOU MAY KILL YOURSELF IF THE ZIP TIES BREAK AND THE SPRING HITS YOU IN THE EYE.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've even heard of people just using a bunch of zip-ties on the springs with the car on the ground. That way, when you put the car in the air, the stock spring will just fall out.
but...how do you put the new one back in?
 

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Is the new one shorter than stock? If so, it won't be too bad. Come to think of it, is there even such a thing as a longer-than-stock spring?


I used an el cheapo Harbor Freight spring compressor - it was good for exactly two spring removal and decompression operations before it broke. But for $10, I didn't expect much. Then I bought a nice Lisle spring compressor for $50 at Pep Boys (I'm sure you can get it cheaper elsewhere), and it worked pretty well. And it was a LOT safer than the POS HF one.

Re-installing the OEM springs would have been a bit tricky, but the SVT ones went in smoothly - that extra 1/2" of clearance really helped.

Somebody here on the Jet said he removed the rear springs by simply prying them loose with a crowbar, but I can't remember how he got the new springs installed. I remember teasing him, though.


I dunno about that Zip-Tie thing - that sounds way too Wile E. Coyote for my taste.
But if you're careful, I suppose it might work.
 

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If you've gotten the bolt to come out of the nut, but it won't come out of the bushing.

it never will.

your going to have to cut that bolt off and replace that arm. the reason being is that the inner sleeve of the bushing and bolt adhere together corrosion and heat and rust.

the inner sleeve detaches itself from the rubber bushing and b/c the bolt and sleeve become larger then the diameter of the opening, it gets stuck adn jsut keeps spinning.
^^ What he said. If you have gotten the bolt to back out of the nut without coming loose, you probably have already damaged the bushing by breaking the bond between the inner sleeve and the rubber of the bushing.

At that point all you can do is cut it out and replace the arm. I had to do this on my car as I did not want to be running around with a damaged bushing in my rear suspension!!

Just make sure you use some anti-seize on the new bolt when you replace the arm.
 
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