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Discussion Starter #1
So we've had this bike hanging up in the garage for about 10 years i would say and now I want to start a new hobby with biking (though i'd like to try out trials). Is this bike worth rebuilding and getting it back on the road (dad needs to get back in shape)? Estimated cost a shop would charge? Is this bike worth anything? Or should we just sell it?











 

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Discussion Starter #3
Went by a local shop and they quoted me $130 to get it road worthy again... tune up, 4 cables, 2 tires, 2 tubes, and chain. Sound reasonable?
 

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$130.00 doesn't sound too bad really if you don't think you can do it yourself.

Does that include greasing any serviceable bearings?

That is a really nice bike, carbon and aluminum with Shimano 600.

My only concern would be the bonds between the carbon tubes and aluminum lugs, make sure they look tight and aren't slipping as that is a concern with bikes built that way.


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Discussion Starter #5
the mentioned that greasing and lubing is included. He also said the bike may be worth $400-$600, is that true?

ummm off topic, but is anyone else getting hyperlinks when posting... such as when i posted the word "tires" it automatically hyperlinked as a url to ebay?
 

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Pedro, thats really not an unreasonable price. I've never cut and sting up the cables (im sure its not hard, but...) and everything else I've done. Its ur call. We could still shop aropund tomorrow if you want. I need new tires for my mtn bike.
 

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the mentioned that greasing and lubing is included. He also said the bike may be worth $400-$600, is that true?

ummm off topic, but is anyone else getting hyperlinks when posting... such as when i posted the word "tires" it automatically hyperlinked as a url to ebay?
$400-$600 sounds reasonable in good running order, maybe more but it depends on your market.

Cables are super easy but if they can really do all the cables, tires, tubes, chain and bearing service for $130.00 I'd do it.

To buy a new bike as nice as that I bet you'd have to spend at LEAST $1200.00, maybe more.

I'm more into vintage steel frame stuff but I see the price tags at the bike shop when I go in and I see bikes like that on Craigslist from time to time.
 

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Its worth saving. Besides the retro graphics look completely sweet.... you'll probably get a lot of compliments.

Here's what I'd do, since it has been sitting so long:
-Tires and tubes. They have a shelf life and at 10 years old they are no longer safe to ride.
-Cables and housings if the cables are rusty.
-Chain
-Rear cassette
-Completely rebuild the hubs with new grease and ball bearings.
-Service the bottom bracket if it can be
-Lube up any pivot points
-Take a look at the bonding between the carbon tubes and aluminum junctions. As Steve mentioned these style frames have been known to have issues from time to time.

I wouldn't suggest you buy a new bike right now. You'd spend about $1000 getting something that nice, and if you don't like it then you're SOL on that purchase. Fix this one up. That $130 sounds awesome, I'd take them up on that. Worst comes to it you don't like cycling and you sell the bike for $400-500 :)
 

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Its worth saving. Besides the retro graphics look completely sweet.... you'll probably get a lot of compliments.

Here's what I'd do, since it has been sitting so long:
-Tires and tubes. They have a shelf life and at 10 years old they are no longer safe to ride.
-Cables and housings if the cables are rusty.
-Chain
-Rear cassette
-Completely rebuild the hubs with new grease and ball bearings.
-Service the bottom bracket if it can be
-Lube up any pivot points
That's about what I do on every bike I rehab, the only thing I don't do is replace the freewheel unless it's worn to the point of jumping.

I don't own anything new enough to have a casette and typically don't work on anything that new either.
 

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Definitley worth saving, that is a nice looking bike. If you find the bike comfortable to ride then by all means keep it. 130$ is a very resonable price for such an extensive tune up, the tires will probobly be around 50$ alone. If you find yourself really getting into riding again you can start adding parts here and there, and transfer them to any new bike you may build in the future. Honestly nothing on that bike looks dated.

p.s. Thoes downtube shifters are sweet! I have them on my O.G. Bianchi.
 

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What everyone else said. Fix it, keep it. It's a nice old bike. And it looks cool.

You could probably get $400 for it. Maybe a bit more, but once you're getting higher you get into the new low-end range. The shop quote is pretty much exactly on par with what I would expect. The tires are whats killing you in that price (probably $30 each for mediocre tires).

If it was me, this is what I would do:
-Tires
-Tubes
-Chain
-Cables AND [email protected]$^!^!^&!!!!!!!!!!!!
-Tuneup

Realistically, if there isn't any other serious issue you should be decently good to go. They may want to service the bottom bracket or headset, which they may include in the who "greasing/lubing" of everything.

Also, as some have mentioned, I would thoroughly visually inspect the entire frame. I wouldn't go psycho over it, but just look over everything for cracks and whatnot. Clearcoat/paint cracks are usually not a huge issue, you just want to make sure nothing is affecting the integrity of the carbon.



*Again: I have to say keep it. You'll be disappointed if you sell it. It's one of those things thats worth more just using it as it is, than trying to make a buck and get something different. With a good tuneup and continuous maintenance, a higher quality old bike like that can be ridden for a long time even if it is carbon.
 

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Very nice bike, keep it. The only thing I couldn't live with is the down tube shifters but that's easily sorted.
Man, good working high-end down tube shifters are pretty awesome to use. A bit nostalgic, but fully functional.

I wouldn't want to race with them, but they work really well. We used to have an old Trek that with old school Dura-Ace on it. For the most part, the shifting was buttery smooth... it just requires a little more thought since reaching down to shift isn't ideal.
 

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Man, good working high-end down tube shifters are pretty awesome to use. A bit nostalgic, but fully functional.

I wouldn't want to race with them, but they work really well. We used to have an old Trek that with old school Dura-Ace on it. For the most part, the shifting was buttery smooth... it just requires a little more thought since reaching down to shift isn't ideal.
I used down tube shifters for about fifteen years and it was a revelation moving to brake shifters, they're so much more convenient. I used to ride in the wrong gear most of the time because you don't want to reach down for them when travelling fast on technical roads. I'd have to fit bar end shifters at the very least.
 

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I don't mind downtube shifters but I much prefer bar end shifters, I have the old Suntours on my SGP and Campagnolo on my CGS.

I will say that the Suntours bar end shifters are far superior to the Campy version and I hate to say it but I think I'll be putting a set of Suntours on the CGS very soon.
 
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