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Discussion Starter #1
My dad and I are going to the Carillon Concourse d' Elegance in Dayton, Ohio this weekend.

Went to high school in nearby Springfield, and my dad worked at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. My mother was a registered nurse at Children's Medical Center in Dayton, so this is going to be going back to my old stomping grounds.

My dad invited his old work friend Joe to go, even bought him a ticket. Joe's a car guy, drives a '40 Ford (license plate FORDY) and a fiberglass bodied Buick V6 powered T bucket. Also has the late 60's F150 with a 390 his dad owned and he learned to drive on.

Looking forward to seeing how things have changed. Last saw Springfield a couple years ago at my 25th high school reunion.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Went there, as we were leaving the ferry boat dock I mentioned to my dad I thought I heard the front brake rubbing. He's deaf in one ear, and said "Yeah, I hear something. Probably a warped rotor."

We drove maybe 20 minutes and stopped for gas. Then he decided we should check the tire pressure. I did that, and noticed the right front wheel (the one I heard the noise from) was hot to the touch. And the wheel seemed to have a lot of brake dust on it.

Drove 3 hours and it got worse and worse, until it was sounding like metal on metal. We got lunch, and he asked me if I thought we could limp it around for a couple days then drive 3 hours back up here to get it fixed.

I said I thought we should get it fixed then and not have to worry about it. He agreed, but he probably was hoping that I'd say that.

There was a Midas near where we ate, took it there and they diagnosed right rear caliper completely frozen, couldn't turn it by hand and the rotor was seriously scored and warped. Right front warped rotor and bad caliper. Rear rotors too thin OEM to turn (much like our MK1's, why manufacturers do this, unless its to sell more parts), so it was new rear rotors, rebuilt calipers, turned front rotors and rebuilt calipers.

Got the parts delivered in 15 minutes and had 2 mechanics working on it. Hour and a half later ($90/hr x 2 mechanics) it was done.

$1510.13, estimate was only $1400 something.

I was looking at the itemized bill, and they put ceramic pads on ("at customer request") for a hundred each end of car. Dad never requested those, and probably wouldn't have wanted them. Lifetime warranty (never seen that on a wear part), but still it was a crappy thing to do.

My dad told them we were from out of town and needed it fixed fast, so I'm sure the manager decided to upsell him.

Kind of put a damper on the trip, and we hadn't even seen the cars yet.

On that note, it was a pretty decent show. Lots of people, cars were parked pretty close together and not (I thought) well displayed. They were grouped in classes, but that was about it.

Featured marque was MG, and the booklet they handed out with admission detailed the evolution of the T series. In the MG corral, TC's were mingled with TD's and TF's. And they didn't even have them in chronological order.

Rarest car there was a late 50's BMW 507, which I voted for People's Choice and Best of Show.

And it was too packed to get decent pictures...
 

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Wow, that's an exorbitantly high bill for a few brakes. I hate Midas, and haven't been to one in at least 25 years, but that said, any and all of the chains are designed to screw the customer... the managers are paid according to profit. Too bad you had so little choice in the matter, being out of town and in a hurry.

It was a car show weekend around here, too. One of the biggest local ones, that's been at the same venue for 48 years, had theirs on Sunday. Car owners come a fair distance to show at the grounds, and there's always a few surprises, especially when Volo Auto Museum rolls in some rarities (I suppose for the advertising value, as well as bragging rights). Always a great time, but I had way too much to do this past weekend to make it... I'm planning on it next year.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I wouldn't have told them we were out of town, but my dad started out saying "We've got a bit of a problem. My son and I drove 3 hours down here for a car show tomorrow, and the brakes are making a horrible noise..."

Manager (who had dollar signs in his eyes) said "Oh, we'll take a look at it for you."

Then he didn't get the estimate in writing, and didn't read the paperwork. He only said "I thought you said 14 hundred.", and let the manager spin him.

Afterward he grumbled "I didn't expect to come down here and spend $1500 on a new brake system for mom's car..."

The other thing I have a problem with, beside the $90 an hour labor, is the 1/2 hour charge to flush the brake system and bleed the brakes. Bleeding the brakes should be included in the price of a 4 replaced calipers, new rear rotors, turned front rotors and up charged pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cars were so close together and there were so many people I didn't get many pictures.

One I did take was of an Ariel Square Four motorcycle.





One I wished I had gotten pics of was a four door diesel four door VW Rabbit. Painted yellow, with black powder coated bumper jacks (like the old Cobras and other sportscars her), lowered on 17" black BBS wheels, fenders flared and debagged.

Trying to look like a race car, and it was a diesel. :lol:

Speaking of Rabbits, we saw this one on the way back home.





I like the Buckeyes, in that they're our biggest state university. But I wouldn't paint a car like this.

For sale, price was $5700.
 

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We ran into that issue with our company truck. We were quoted at $1900 to replace the brakes on our F350. I bought the parts and had our foreman do the install. Total cost including parts was $1,100 with his hourly rate.

This was new pads and rotors front and rear and two new rear callipers because the old ones froze.
 

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Wow, that Ariel 4 is fabulous. It is said to be one of the smoothest bike engines ever built, even better than flat-2 BMWs. If I had known at the time that engine (upgraded) was installed on a Healey 1000/4 between '71 and '77, I'd very likely STILL be the proud owner of that classic.
 

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Wow, that Ariel 4 is fabulous. It is said to be one of the smoothest bike engines ever built, even better than flat-2 BMWs. If I had known at the time that engine (upgraded) was installed on a Healey 1000/4 between '71 and '77, I'd very likely STILL be the proud owner of that classic.
You lost me, which engine in what Healey?

-Steve
 

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I guess I was a little to brief. When I Googled the Ariel Square 4, I found it was made long before I was ever close to being old enough to buy a motorcycle, but the engine was used later in a Healey motorcycle at a time when I was selling my BSA 650.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ariel_Square_Four

Not Austin-Healey, just Healey... would have had to import it, but I'm sure that could have been done.
 

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Wow, that Ariel 4 is fabulous. It is said to be one of the smoothest bike engines ever built, even better than flat-2 BMWs...
Yeah, problem with those BMW flat twins was the torque. Turns in one direction (not that band) going with the rotation were pretty easy. Going the other direction was much harder. Especially when trying to put power down.
 

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I guess I was a little to brief. When I Googled the Ariel Square 4, I found it was made long before I was ever close to being old enough to buy a motorcycle, but the engine was used later in a Healey motorcycle at a time when I was selling my BSA 650.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ariel_Square_Four

Not Austin-Healey, just Healey... would have had to import it, but I'm sure that could have been done.
Ok, makes more sense now. :)

-Steve
 

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Yeah, problem with those BMW flat twins was the torque. Turns in one direction (not that band) going with the rotation were pretty easy. Going the other direction was much harder. Especially when trying to put power down.
Similar issues with the Moto Guzzi transversely mounted V-twins. Rider wants to go one way, torque wants to pull the bike the other way.

-Steve
 
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