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I Now Post Stupid ****
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Discussion Starter #1
Forgive me if this sounds like a stupid question but I know almost nothing about Wheel Offset (Which explains why I purchased 40MM Offset Motegi's without even researching into it.) But do wheel spacers do anything to your offset? I think the previous shop may have put them on. Should I take them off?

ALSO does anyone elses Drivers Side FRONT tires stick out more than all the others? Is this because that's where the power goes too? I've never seen this except on mine.
 

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Yes, they change offset. If you have 40mm offset wheels, a 10mm spacer would make them 30mm. This why you should ALWAYS buy a higher numerical offset when you have any doubts. A 50mm offset can become a 45mm with spacers, but until someone invents an anti-matter spacer, it isn't going to happen the other way around.
 

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I have wonderous butt cheeks
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Here's my guess, and it is a guess, so if its wrong, go stab someone else.

Maybe they had to use spacers because the back of the wheel was incorrect for the car, as in the caliper on the front was rubbing on the back of the wheel, so instead of informing you of this, they figured they could fix it and you may never know.
 

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Yes, they change offset. If you have 40mm offset wheels, a 10mm spacer would make them 30mm. This why you should ALWAYS buy a higher numerical offset when you have any doubts. A 50mm offset can become a 45mm with spacers, but until someone invents an anti-matter spacer, it isn't going to happen the other way around.
I think you have that backwards. Adding a 10mm spacer to a 40mm wheel will give you the equivalent of a 50mm offset wheel (the mating surface to the hub is now 50mm from the centerline of the wheel). However, you are correct in saying that you should buy a higher numerical offset when you have any doubts (about clearance to the strut/shock/caliper).

Also, Jibberish18, I hope they installed longer studs to go with the spacers. Check to see if the lug nuts have at least 5 rotations of engagement.
 

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Yes, they change offset. If you have 40mm offset wheels, a 10mm spacer would make them 30mm. This why you should ALWAYS buy a higher numerical offset when you have any doubts. A 50mm offset can become a 45mm with spacers, but until someone invents an anti-matter spacer, it isn't going to happen the other way around.
I think you have that backwards. Adding a 10mm spacer to a 40mm wheel will give you the equivalent of a 50mm offset wheel (the mating surface to the hub is now 50mm from the centerline of the wheel). However, you are correct in saying that you should buy a higher numerical offset when you have any doubts (about clearance to the strut/shock/caliper).
Actually, you are making a common mistake. The offset that you see on the wheel is a negative number in almost all modern cars. Therefore a spacer adds to the offset. -50 +10 = -40.
 

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From Compomotive Wheels site:
The offset of a wheel is the measurement of the hub surface contact area in offset from the center line of the overall rim width of the wheel. A wheel whose hub surface contact area sits further towards the outside of the wheel than the center line has a positive offset. A wheel whose hub surface contact area sits further towards the inside of the wheel than the centerline has a negative offset
 

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Don't Call Me Gaga!
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I think you have that backwards. Adding a 10mm spacer to a 40mm wheel will give you the equivalent of a 50mm offset wheel (the mating surface to the hub is now 50mm from the centerline of the wheel).
How can you move the mating surface farther from the centerline by adding material?

It is +40mm - 10mm = +30mm.

Spacers subtract, not add.

Edit: I'm late, as usual.
 

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until someone invents an anti-matter spacer
Hmmmmm...I see a market opportunity here
Anyone good with quantum physics round here?
 

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Don't Call Me Gaga!
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Hmmmmm...I see a market opportunity here
Anyone good with quantum physics round here?
Imagine the automotive advantages of two objects in the same space at the same time. Piston to valve clearance would never be an issue again.
 

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I stand corrected. So wheel spacers are negative numbers.
No you don't stand corrected. There appears to be no industry convention Rich. I know Ford suspension designers, and they use your convention.

You're both right.
 

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DoubleStuf™
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Imagine dropping a huge 10 liter v12 turbo diesel into a focus? You wouldn't even need to relocate the battery to the trunk!

So if I'm buying an aftermarket wheel for the FOCUS... who's standard should I follow? Should I buy a wheel with more or less offset if I want to use a spacer to get things just right?
 

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a wheel with a bigger number than the offset you want.
 

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I Now Post Stupid ****
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Discussion Starter #16
SO wheel spacers should've actually helped me out with things such as rubbing issues? Becuase I know SVT wheels are 48 MM offset I believe? And those are used for no rubbing.

BTW any idea why one tire would stick out more than the rest?
 

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SO wheel spacers should've actually helped me out with things such as rubbing issues? Becuase I know SVT wheels are 48 MM offset I believe? And those are used for no rubbing.

BTW any idea why one tire would stick out more than the rest?
No. Spacers only reduce the number number on all modern cars. Smaller number = wheels further out from hub.
 

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Think about what could be meant by offset...the amount of distance of the mating surface from the center line of the wheel. A 50MM offset moves the mating surface 50MM from the centerline of the wheel. 40MM is 10MM closer to the centerline, moves the outer lip of the wheel further outside toward the fender lip and often creates a "deep-dish" appearance with your rims. Theoretically, a 0 offset rim would have the mating surface precisely halfway between the inner and outer lips of your wheels. A FWD car will almost invariably have a higher numerical offset than RWD cars. Foci, if I am not mistaken, come with 47MM offset rims from the factory.
 
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