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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, thinking about some new rotors. Which does everyone on THIS forum prefer?

EBC
Brembo
PowerSlot
Others?

I have checked several sites, and I DO plan on getting slotted (maybe dimpled as well). Any ideas and cheapest places to buy?

NOTE: I have checked Tirerack.com and BatINC.net
 

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Don't Call Me Gaga!
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I recommend the Brembo OEM style from Tirerack.

...at the most, a slotted rotor, but I'd avoid dimples and slots at all costs.

For the most part, a rotor is a rotor, as long as it is flat and free of defects.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Why would you avoid slots or dimples? I know they can generate a little noise, but if its not TOO loud, I wouldnt mind.
 

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I have EBC's all around and couldn't be happier.
 

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Don't Call Me Gaga!
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Why would you avoid slots or dimples? I know they can generate a little noise, but if its not TOO loud, I wouldnt mind.
I meant to say dimples or cross-drills. It is an appearance modification, and can make the rotor weaker and more prone to cracking.

Slots are the most I'd consider, and even that will never have much of a benefit to most people.
 

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ya i've always heard that but then wondered why a factory car would have that.EX Corvette, porshe,benz so on.
 

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Don't Call Me Gaga!
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ya i've always heard that but then wondered why a factory car would have that.EX Corvette, porshe,benz so on.
I'll just leave it at two things:

1) They have engineering teams that have enough computer power to make it work.
2) They have marketing teams that can sell it.

Here is what TireRack has to say about it concerning their PowerSlot and Brembo products.
IMPORTANT REMINDER: Slotted, drilled or dimpled rotors offered as OEM replacements should not be considered appropriate for high-speed track use.

While grooved, drilled and slotted rotors offer an enhanced appearance and add some resistance to the boundary layer of gasses that can build up between the pad and rotor, they are not designed to withstand the extreme temperatures that are produced on the racetrack. If they are used on the track, it is very important that the rotors be carefully inspected and should not be driven on if even minor signs of deterioration are seen. Note, too, that if any products are used on the track they are not warrantable.
Here is what StopTech has to say about it:

For many years most racing rotors were drilled. There were two reasons - the holes gave the "fireband" boundary layer of gasses and particulate matter someplace to go and the edges of the holes gave the pad a better "bite".


Unfortunately the drilled holes also reduced the thermal capacity of the discs and served as very effective "stress raisers" significantly decreasing disc life. Improvements in friction materials have pretty much made the drilled rotor a thing of the past in racing. Most racing rotors currently feature a series of tangential slots or channels that serve the same purpose without the attendant disadvantages.
TCE Performance Products:
Q: I noticed you said drilled rotors are an option, why do you not recommend them? Even Porsches use them, but I’m told they’re better because they are cast into them.
A: Drilled rotors, aside from the minimal weight savings offered, don't do as much to enhance the kits performance as some people like to believe. In fact they can cause more harm than good. The drilling of the rotor is to mainly remove the gasous/particle build up developed by the friction materials against the rotor surface more than cool the iron. Problem is that when the air rushing through these holes is significantly cooler than the rotor temperature we begin to develop thermal stress cracks in the iron. These start as small stress cracks, but over time become larger and can lead to major cracking problems. While the outer surface of the hole is chamfered to help this, the inner area of the center vaneis not. * Don't be fooled by some of the advertising in this regard. TCE recommends gas slots and supplies nearly all kits this with them. This is to help 'vent' the pad and create a self cleaning effect of the pad as the rotor passes over it. Keep in mind that either of these (drilled or slotted) will lead to faster pad wear and more dusting. As for the Porsche rotors being cast; that’s a myth. They are drilled like all others, and given the completely different weight bias of a rear or mid engine car the requirements of the brake system differ then that of most FWD applications also.
At the end of the day, you are the consumer and have the power to choose, obviously. Don't take it from me, take it from folks who know their brakes.
 

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I tried drilled rotors on a SPO ( S uper P roduction, O ver 2 liter) Mustang I used for SOLO I and hillclimbs. Managed to seriously crack them in a single weekend, AND they were 4 times more than solids.
The Wilwood solid rotors I use on my current A/Sedan last about a season on the front and I can still use them on the rears another season, so I only have to buy 2 each season. Much cheaper than every weekend.
Like Omni said, For bling, they are maybe ok. For anything serious, go solids.
 
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