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Still trying to find that TDi to push your big S-Class, &-Series or A8, well wait no more.

745i TDi
S 400CDi
A8 <font color="red">4.2L TDi </font> Looking for the specs now.


240 kW (326 bhp): With this extremely impressive power output, the new Audi A8 4.2 TDI quattro puts itself ahead of all the other diesel-engined cars on the international market. The entirely redeveloped 4.2-litre, eight-cylinder biturbo engine accelerates the lightweight saloon with its aluminium body from 0 to 100 km/h (0 – 62 mph) in just 5.9 seconds. The top speed is electronically restricted to 250 km/h. In addition to these dynamic qualities, the new power plant displays the kind of refinement that sets standards even in the top segment of the motoring world, and ennobles the A8 4.2 TDI quattro, turning it into the perfect long-distance touring saloon.

The new engine is also exemplary in terms of economy. Combined as standard with quattro permanent four-wheel drive and 6-speed tiptronic transmission, it uses on average just 9.4 litres of diesel fuel for every 100 kilometres. This means it will cover more than 950 kilometres (590 miles) on a full tank without a stop.
The Audi A8 4.2 TDI quattro is equipped as standard with a diesel particulate filter, which works without additives and consequently lasts the lifetime of the vehicle without servicing.

The A8 4.2 quattro has a chassis with air suspension and adaptive damping – otherwise known as Audi adaptive air suspension. It allows the vehicle to be driven either in a decidedly sporty fashion or with an extremely comfortable ride, just as the driver wishes.

Like the other A8 models, the new TDI has the exclusive front end with single-frame radiator grille. The luxury saloon can be ordered from beginning of June either with the standard wheelbase or in its long-wheelbase version, which is 130 millimetres longer. First deliveries will take place in the third quarter of 2005. The basic price of the A8 4.2 TDI quattro in Germany is € 81.000.

The sheer power and the characteristics of this eight-cylinder power unit once again reaffirm the credentials of the Audi A8 as the sportiest saloon car in the luxury segment. And thanks to its top-of-the-range TDI, Audi yet again demonstrates its expertise and its lead in the development of such powerful, refined and, not least, economical diesel engines.

Entirely redesigned engine

The predecessor of the new A8 4.2 TDI had already scored top marks among the luxury-class diesel saloons with its 4-litre, eight-cylinder engine. Thanks to its 275 bhp and 650 Nm of torque, it was the most powerful V8 diesel-engined car for a long period following its debut in the summer of 2003. Its fuel consumption figures of just 9.6 litres per 100 km also earned it a top place among its competitors. With these features the A8 4.0 TDI succeeded in becoming the European number one among the V8 diesel luxury saloons, with a market share of 71 %.

In the light of such statistics, the development goals for the new TDI represented a daunting challenge:

- The most powerful car diesel engine on the market.
- Top figures in terms of driving dynamics, with low fuel consumption
- Optimum engine acoustics
- Low weight
- Compact, short design

In order to implement these specifications, Audi's TDI development team designed an entirely new engine. Just like the 3.0 and 2.7 TDI before it, the 4.2-litre V8 TDI is a member of Audi's new family of V-format engines, and has chain-drive for the camshaft and ancillaries.

The cylinder spacing in the new engine block is now 90 millimetres. This gives the engine a compact overall length of just 520 millimetres. One current competitor V8 with the same engine capacity measures all of 140 millimetres more.

The engine block weighing 62 kg altogether is made of vermicular graphite cast iron (GGV) – an important factor in achieving the low engine weight of only 255 kilograms. This is 15 kilograms less than its predecessor, the 4.0 TDI.

The 4.2 TDI is thus one of the lightest V8 diesels ever. This benefits the power-to-weight ratio and the weight distribution in equal measure – two characteristics that are of central importance for the driving dynamics of the new A8 4.2 TDI quattro.

With an engine capacity of 4,134 cc, the combustion chambers of the new engine are almost exactly 0.2 litres bigger than in the case of the 4.0 TDI. The bore has been enlarged by 2 mm compared with its predecessor, to 83 millimetres, and the stroke of 95.5 millimetres is identical with that of the 4.0 TDI. The compression ratio is 16.5 : 1.

The surfaces of the cylinder bores are treated using UV laser exposure. This special honing process ensures significantly reduced oil consumption in the TDI engine, and, as a result, a significant reduction in particulate formation during combustion.

The forged crankshaft made of chrome molybdenum steel is offset in such a way that forces and moments of the first and second order are avoided – a decisive bonus delivering extremely low levels of vibration.




Chain drive for camshaft and ancillaries

The cylinder head is made of aluminium, and two camshafts are used to operate the valves in each. They are driven via a maintenance-free chain drive, which also drives the oil, water and power-assisted steering pumps.

There are four valves per cylinder, for optimum charging of the combustion chamber. The valves on the new V8 are operated by roller cam followers with hydraulic valve clearance compensation. This low-friction drive technique plays a decisive part in reducing both the fuel consumption and the emissions of the 4.2-litre engine.

The use of roller cam followers is likewise beneficial to the engine's acoustics. In conjunction with the twisted-type and therefore virtually play-free camshaft drive, these followers are instrumental to the reduction in mechanical noise from the valve gear and contribute to the 4.2 TDI's outstandingly quiet running.

The rigid construction of the engine block and the unit’s effective encapsulation also help to lessen the sound emitted by the eight-cylinder engine.

Biturbo with two intercoolers

A concept that has already proven its worth on the 4.0 TDI engine. Two turbochargers with variable turbine geometry deliver high torque even at low engine speeds, in conjunction with high power output.
Variable turbine geometry means that the flow of exhaust gas to the turbine rotor can be optimised depending on load and engine speed. By means of air mass metering, the engine management ensures that both turbochargers run constantly at the same speed and therefore achieve the same delivery rate. Maximum boost pressure is 2.5 bar; the turbochargers rotate at up to 226,000 revolutions per minute.

The variable turbine geometry is supported by electrically operated actuators on the new 4.2 TDI. These actuators adjust the vanes faster and more precisely: particularly at low engine speeds, this means a more rapid build-up of boost pressure, thus achieving an excellent response.

The 4.2 TDI has two intercoolers, arranged on the right and left in front of the engine. They are ideally positioned in the airflow beneath the headlights, and are therefore capable of operating extremely efficiently.

Each of the two turbochargers serves one bank of cylinders. The two intake manifolds are interconnected by means of a "feedthrough" system, to equalise the pressure between the right and left cylinder banks. This feature boosts cylinder charging and consequently enhances the engine's output.

There are continuously variable swirl flaps integrated into the intake tract. These permit the air movement to be adjusted to suit the engine speed and load at the time. High tumble at low engine load results in optimised combustion, just as low tumble does at high engine load.
In practice this means that a closed swirl duct at low load increases swirl, while open ducts at high load boost cylinder charging.

Common rail technology with piezo injectors

The Bosch EDC16 CP system, with fuel delivery, trigger-start, boost pressure and exhaust-gas recirculation control, is responsible for engine management on the V8 TDI. As on the A8 with a petrol engine, this electronic system now means that it is possible to start the engine automatically at the push of a button.

Mixture preparation is by means of a latest-generation common rail system. It has a high-pressure pump – located inside the V of the engine – and one pressurized pipe or "rail" for each cylinder bank. The maximum injector pressure is now 1,600 bar, 250 bar more than with previous common-rail systems, a value that corresponds with the weight of a medium-sized saloon on the surface area of a fingernail.

This high injection pressure results in even finer atomisation of the fuel and therefore in better mixture preparation and more efficient combustion. The consequence is not merely extra power and torque, but also reduced fuel consumption and emissions.

The piezo inline injectors are undoubtedly the most important innovation of the new common rail system. Electrically excitable piezo crystals undertake the triggering of the injectors. As soon as a voltage is applied to the crystals,
they contract and, assisted by a hydraulic element, mechanically trigger the opening of the injector needle.

The piezo injectors offer multiple advantages compared with conventional solenoid valves. The moving masses on the injector needles can, for instance, be reduced by no less than 75 percent, from sixteen to four grams in each case.

This enables considerably smaller and more precisely metered injection quantities. At the same time, piezo technology permits a higher injector needle speed. With a value of 1.3 metres per second, the piezo system responds twice as fast as other common rail injectors.

The number of injection processes per combustion cycle can thus be varied almost at will. In the case of the 4.2 V8, the Audi TDI development team decided on up to four injections. In the lower engine speed range there is a double injection in addition to the main injection, and a single pre-injection in the mid-range.

This strategy produces a smoother combustion process, the benefits of which are most immediately apparent in the engine's acoustic behaviour. The 4.2 TDI engine has once again become significantly quieter and smoother-running, even compared to its already highly cultivated predecessor, and without doubt it sets the benchmark for the class in this discipline.

The fuel is injected into the combustion chamber via eight-hole jets. They too play a major part in making the combustion process ultra-efficient, and thus improving the quality of emissions, by distributing the fuel homogeneously throughout the combustion chamber.




Highly effective exhaust emission control

The 4.2 TDI has a twin-pipe exhaust system with particulate filters as standard. In each exhaust pipe the cleaning of the exhaust gases is undertaken by an oxidising catalytic converter close to the engine and a catalytically coated particulate filter.

The catalytic converter close to the engine ensures adherence to the EU-4 limits by rapidly converting hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

The particulate filter, made of silicon carbide with thin-wall technology, is located in the under-floor area. The combination of thin-wall technology and catalytic coating enables controlled regeneration from temperatures of approx. 580 ºC, with simultaneously low exhaust back pressure. This is reflected in only marginally increased fuel consumption and enhanced regeneration efficiency.

The A8 4.2 can cover distances of up to 2,000 kilometres before the filter reaches its maximum charge level. The charge status of the filter is continuously checked by means of monitoring of the exhaust back pressure and parallel simulation calculation for both exhaust pipes separately.

When regeneration becomes necessary, the engine management system generates the required increase in temperature by means of measures taken within the engine and exothermic conversion of unburned hydrocarbons in the oxidising catalytic converter. Up to 5 injections are also possible with the common-rail injection system used at Audi.

Top performance and impressive fuel economy

The 4.2 TDI engine is currently the most powerful diesel engine to be found in any production saloon car. 240 kW (326 bhp) at 3,750 rpm are the new benchmark – an increase of no less than 51 bhp over its 275 bhp predecessor.

The A8 4.2 TDI quattro has the performance of a top athlete.

This lightweight luxury saloon with its aluminium body takes only 5.9 seconds to sprint from a standstill to 100 km/h – making it quicker than any other diesel saloon on the international market. It is capable of a governed top speed of 250 km/h. The torque gives the driver a feeling of pulling power in every speed range that is otherwise only to be experienced in a sports car. 650 Newton-metres between 1,600 and 3,500 rpm – this figure makes the A8 4.2 TDI quattro the Audi with the most torque of them all.

Despite the 51 bhp increase in engine output, the new Audi A8 4.2 TDI quattro consumes no more fuel than its predecessor – quite the opposite,in fact: Average consumption of just 9.4 litres / 100 km means a cut in fuel consumption of 0.2 litres – a figure that is nothing less than sensational!

Audi A8 4.2 TDI quattro: Supreme sportiness

All Audi A8 V8 TDI models are equipped with 6-speed tiptronic transmission with DSP dynamic gearshift programme and additional sports programme. The engine's output and torque are always unleashed with such precision that the conflicting requirements of spontaneous power flow, high performance and perfectly refined running are all achieved.

Quattro permanent four-wheel drive converts the engine's performance into superbly effective propulsion and cornering stability, effortlessly and safely converting its enormous torque onto the road. The aluminium Audi Space Frame (ASF) body provides the high-strength basis for low weight, dynamic performance and excellent handling.

The Audi A8 has an aluminium chassis with four-link front suspension and self-tracking trapezoidal-link rear suspension. Adaptive air suspension – an air suspension system with continuous damper control – provides the driving characteristics suitable for every driving situation. It simultaneously reduces body movement, thus optimizing road holding and comfort.

With its combination of a powerful TDI, highly developed lightweight construction and the dynamic qualities of its suspension, the Audi A8 4.2 TDI presents itself as a luxury saloon offering a new level of sporty dynamism and superiority.
 

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The VW/Audi group has definetely been at the forefront of diesel technology in the last 10-15 years. And the engines are impressive as hell if we are stuck on using oil.

I would love to see Audi/VW through more of it's research dollars behind something that is renewable and not something that we have to rely on from other's like oil.

I've heard of research going into diesel/hybirds which is another great step, it just seems that we'll never reach the Atlas Shrugged dream of turning static electricity into the ultimate fuel source.
 

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What i don't understand is why are there no Hybrid diesels???? WOuld seem like the best of both worlds. Hell Cruise ships are basically Diesel Hybrids.
Think about diesel locomotives also. They're essentially hybrid diesels because efficiency is exteremly important when you're using several gallons per mile instead of getting several miles per gallon.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
4.5 is actually a 4.0 with the boost turned up same as the 535 tdi 3.0 with more boost.
 

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I've been under the impression (for quite some time) that the reason we haven't yet seen a diesel/electric hybrid is that it would produce a ton of low-end torque, but fall on its face at the top end.

It makes sense, too; diesel engines and electric motors make a ton of torque a little above idle. Neither of them revs stratospherically to make huge top end, though that diesel/electric pairing might be outstanding for industrial apps., - or anywhere that torque and hauling power might be required - especially in light of its (probable) relative efficiency.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A 1.9L hasa better topend than the Focus. 2.5 TDi cars normally have a 250kpm limiter. In europe most TDi are rather fast.
 

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There are diesel electric hybrids…

They are called city busses. Around here where I live they are coming out with allot of hybrid busses. There primary motors are diesel, but they have auxiliary batter packs, placed in a bulge on the roof.

If they can get it to work on a city bus, I’m sure they can get it to work for a car.
 

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I've been under the impression (for quite some time) that the reason we haven't yet seen a diesel/electric hybrid is that it would produce a ton of low-end torque, but fall on its face at the top end.

It makes sense, too; diesel engines and electric motors make a ton of torque a little above idle. Neither of them revs stratospherically to make huge top end, though that diesel/electric pairing might be outstanding for industrial apps., - or anywhere that torque and hauling power might be required - especially in light of its (probable) relative efficiency.
So.. hybrid rotary?
 

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There are diesel electric hybrids…

They are called city busses. Around here where I live they are coming out with allot of hybrid busses. There primary motors are diesel, but they have auxiliary batter packs, placed in a bulge on the roof.

If they can get it to work on a city bus, I’m sure they can get it to work for a car.
I stand corrected...

It makes sense, too; diesel engines and electric motors make a ton of torque a little above idle. Neither of them revs stratospherically to make huge top end, though that diesel/electric pairing might be outstanding for industrial apps., - or anywhere that torque and hauling power might be required - especially in light of its (probable) relative efficiency.
So, I was right about a heavy-duty application... cool. But would you want a car that could rip small buildings from their foundations but not be able to top 50 or 60 miles per hour? I want it to be able to do at least 120mph... and tear buildings off their foundations.
 

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bus
bus
battery pack


CTTRANSIT Introduces Hybrid-Electric Buses
6/24/2003

Cleaner air. Brighter future. This is the message conveyed on a pair of next generation buses that recently entered service in Hartford.

The peaceful nature scene displayed on Connecticut's first two hybrid-electric buses signifies more than just a pretty picture. The vehicles promise both cleaner air and a brighter future by reducing emissions and improving fuel economy. The buses, which operate on regular Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) routes, are powered by a combination of an internal combustion clean diesel engine paired with a generator, electric storage system, and two electric motors.

"These buses represent a cost-effective solution for the transit industry," said Harry Harris, bureau chief for the Connecticut Department of Transportation's (CDOT) Bureau of Public Transportation. "We're working to make mass transit as fuel efficient and environmentally friendly as possible."

The buses, which were purchased primarily with federal highway funding, were introduced at a ceremony June 16, 2003 and entered into service the next day. Those attending the event had the opportunity to look inside the battery compartment atop one of the buses. They were also treated to a ride. The two buses, which offer better acceleration and a quieter ride than a typical transit bus, will be operated in all types of revenue service.

CTTRANSIT Training Supervisor Pat Smith, who took the event passengers on their first ride, said the new buses do have a slight difference in acceleration and that he has posted a notice to operators with points on the main differences between the hybrid-electric and regular diesel buses.

Mary Beth Mello, deputy regional administrator for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), said projects such as the hybrid-electric buses in Connecticut are being done across the country. The FTA has supplied a grant for the testing portion of the project.

CTTRANSIT also received another financial boost from the East Coast Hybrid Consortium in the amount of $100,000. Yina Moore, executive director of the Consortium, presented the check at the event, to be used toward program performance testing and evaluation. The operating characteristics of the hybrid-electric buses will be compared to a standard diesel bus. Mileage, fuel economy and other consumable fluids data will be collected daily and emissions and braking information will also be tracked.

Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Arthur Rocque, who spoke at the event, noted that the hybrid-electric buses have the same emission rate as a vehicle fueled by natural gas. He noted that 70% of pollution comes from motor vehicles and their off-road counterparts.

CTTRANSIT is partnering with the University of Connecticut, the Connecticut Department of Transportation, New Flyer Industries, Allison Transmission, the East Coast Hybrid Consortium and the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering in a two-year study. Steve Warren, CTTRANSIT's assistant general manager of maintenance services, expects the study will gain national recognition and expand the knowledge of hybrid bus technology.

The fuel economy of the hybrid vehicles is expected to be about a 25-35% improvement over buses in the current CTTRANSIT fleet and emissions will be reduced by 50 to 90%. The hybrid buses will also have a greater longevity of brakes, resulting in a reduced need to replace brake linings. Braking energy normally lost to friction and heat will be recovered and stored in nickel metal hydride batteries. Two electrical motors will use this saved electricity to help propel the bus.

"The hybrid design promises a significant improvement in emissions and fuel economy because the diesel engine can be finely tuned and energy lost in braking can be recovered electrically," explained Warren. "With this exciting new program, CTTRANSIT will continue to be a leader in advanced transit bus technology in the country."

CTTRANSIT is the state-owned bus transit system serving the greater Hartford, New Haven, Stamford, Waterbury, New Britain, Meriden, Bristol and Wallingford areas.


from


CTTRANSIT HYBRID BUSES COMPLETE FIRST PHASE OF TESTING; MOVE TO STAMFORD
6/9/2004

(STAMFORD, CT)-Cleaner air. Brighter future. For the past year, CTTRANSIT's two hybrid-electric buses have been promising to deliver both clean air and a bright future by reducing emissions and improving fuel economy.

Since they were introduced in June 2003, the New Flyer hybrid buses have been tested for fuel economy, reliability, maintenance expense, and emissions. CTTRANSIT, in partnership with the Connecticut Department of Transportation (CDOT) Bureaus' of Public Transportation and Research, the University of Connecticut, the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, New Flyer Bus Company, Allison Electric Drive, Horiba Instruments and the East Coast Hybrid Consortium, has found the new vehicles to be more fuel efficient than the average diesel bus.

Throughout the testing period, the vehicles have been operating on regular Hartford-area routes. As of June 14, 2004, the hybrids will begin operating in the Stamford area. The buses, which offer customers a quieter ride, are easily recognizable by the peaceful nature scene displayed on the sides of the bus.

"The hybrid buses are powered by a combination of an internal combustion clean diesel engine paired with a generator, electric storage system, and two electric motors," explained CDOT Manager of Research James Sime. "The next generation vehicles have the potential to reduce emissions and improve fuel economy and our testing program is beginning to prove this to be true."

In eleven months of testing, the hybrid buses have been found to be 10-15% more fuel efficient than the newest comparable diesel bus and 30-35% more fuel efficient than the current CTTRANSIT fleet average. The hybrid buses have also proved to have lower on-going maintenance cost, as well as a reduced need to replace brake linings, than the average diesel bus in the CTTRANSIT fleet.

"The hybrids have been remarkably reliable considering the advanced technology that they utilize," said CTTRANSIT Hybrid Field Test Manager John Warhola.

The innovative testing program is unique, according to project partner UCONN Assistant Professor Baki Cetegen. "This program utilizes mobile in-vehicle emissions testing. Most emissions testing is done in a laboratory- in an environment meant to simulate real world conditions. This testing program allows data to be collected on actual CTTRANSIT bus routes, which is much more accurate," he said.

In the first phase of testing, the hybrid buses were run on regular #1 diesel fuel. In Stamford, the next phase of testing will determine emissions when the buses are operated on ultralow sulfur diesel. On this new fuel type, a 30-40% reduction in emissions is likely. In the fall, CTTRANSIT expects to conduct its third and final testing phase by adding a special diesel particulate filter to the hybrid buses. Emissions are expected to be reduced by over 90% and will be cleaner than a comparable compressed natural gas bus.

CTTRANSIT is the state-owned bus transit system serving the greater Hartford, New Haven, Stamford, Waterbury, New Britain, Meriden, Bristol and Wallingford areas.

from


CONNECTICUT'S HYBRID DIESEL-ELECTRIC BUSES WIN AWARD FOR INNOVATION
1/19/2005

(HARTFORD)-Connecticut's two hybrid diesel-electric buses were recognized as an innovative improvement recently as CTTRANSIT was awarded The Connecticut Quality Improvement Award (CQIA) Silver Innovation Prize. The CQIA recognizes the efforts of innovative programs to improve quality, performance and marketplace competitiveness.

Since they were introduced in June 2003, the New Flyer hybrid buses have been tested for fuel economy, reliability, maintenance expense, and emissions. CTTRANSIT, in partnership with the Connecticut Department of Transportation (CDOT) Bureaus' of Public Transportation and Research, the University of Connecticut, the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, New Flyer Bus Company, Allison Electric Drive, Horiba Instruments and the East Coast Hybrid Consortium, has found the new vehicles to be more fuel efficient than the average diesel bus.

"The hybrid buses are powered by a combination of an internal combustion clean diesel engine paired with a generator, electric storage system, and two electric motors," notes CDOT Manager of Research James Sime. "These next generation vehicles have the potential to reduce emissions and improve fuel economy and our testing program is beginning to prove this to be true." To date, the hybrid buses have averaged 10% better fuel economy than their peer diesel buses and 35% better than the CTTRANSIT fleet average.

CTTRANSIT has gathered data on the buses for comparison to identical new clean diesel buses, as well as to the average CTTRANSIT fleet. During the testing period, the buses were operated in Hartford and Stamford, using both regular #1 diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel, and were elaborately monitored for performance, fuel consumption and emissions.

"We are pleased to have had the opportunity to manufacture these buses for CTTRANSIT," said John Marinucci, President and CEO of New Flyer. "As the North American leader in heavy-duty hybrid buses and the 2004 recipient of CALSTART's Blue Sky Award, we understand better than anyone how significant this accomplishment is and we congratulate CTTRANSIT on this prestigious award."

After close to 19 months of testing, CTTRANSIT has found that the hybrid buses have also performed as well or better than conventional buses in terms of reliability and maintenance. Because the buses use regenerative braking, brake wear is significantly diminished, resulting in a more than 50% increase in distance between brake repairs.

A final report on the demonstration project and recommendations are due in early summer, 2005.

The hybrid buses are currently running in regular service in the Stamford area.

CTTRANSIT is the state-owned bus transit system serving the greater Hartford, New Haven, Stamford, Waterbury, New Britain, Meriden, Bristol and Wallingford areas.

from

and
on solar power but mentions the busses 1/2 down
 

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Cool. Thanks for sharing.
 

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The VW/Audi group has definetely been at the forefront of diesel technology in the last 10-15 years. And the engines are impressive as hell if we are stuck on using oil.

I would love to see Audi/VW through more of it's research dollars behind something that is renewable and not something that we have to rely on from other's like oil.

I've heard of research going into diesel/hybirds which is another great step, it just seems that we'll never reach the Atlas Shrugged dream of turning static electricity into the ultimate fuel source.

Biodiesel.
 
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